linguaphilioist
linguaphilioist:

tesdefonceoutesgay:

linguaphilioist:

I read some of this this afternoon, here’s some vocab:
Un lotissement - allotment subdivision (of land) On se croirait - one would believe (reflexive) used in the phrase ‘on se croirait en banlieue parisienne’ - one would believe themselves to be in a Parisian suburb.  Se hâter - to rush oneself Bourgades - towns Boîte de nuit - nightclub Piétiner - to trample On se prend à réfléchir… - one starts to think… Une grève de la faim - a hunger strike Poignardé - stabbed Osé - dared to  On s’en fout? - who cares? Charnues - fleshy (pl)le Moule - mold (shaped container) Revendication - claim/demand Sitôt que - as soon as Voué - dedicated Aveugler - to blind Atouts - assets Raz-de-marée - tidal wave Mollets - calves J’y ai pris goût - I’ve taken a liking Fleurir - to flourish/bloom Vertus - virtues Rayonner - to shine Axée sur - focused on

I hope it’s okay if I correct things, I assume it is unless told otherwise, because I just want to help and I don’t want people to learn false things.
I didn’t know the translation of lotissement, nor did I know “allotment” so I checked these up and if I understood right they’re mostly false friends! I’m still not 100% sure though.
I added details on the word moule/mold (or mould) because there are different meanings in English and French (depending on the gender for the latter):
le moule, nm : mold (shaped container)
mouler, vtr : to mold
la moule, nf : mussel
la moisissure, nf : mold (fungus)
I also recommend to always add the article to nouns to learn the gender more easily: le/la or un/une (especially if the definite article is l’).

Thanks! I used an online translator for the translations, so I appreciate the correction! I totally agree with the article thing, so I’ll definitely start doing that. Aveugler was being used as a noun in the magazine, so I’m a bit confused. It looks like a verb to me too! As for le moule, it was in the context of ideas of beauty and ‘breaking the mould’ - so abstract noun as well as concrete? Thanks again!

The article for the gender is a thing I recommend for every language with grammatical genders and separate articles, especially since the endings in French rarely help guessing the gender.
What was the sentence containing “aveugler”? was it something like “blablah cette chose va l’aveugler”? because if yes, it is not a noun but a verb :) l’ being the pronoun for him/her (direct object).
Yes literal and figurative meaning :)

linguaphilioist:

tesdefonceoutesgay:

linguaphilioist:

I read some of this this afternoon, here’s some vocab:

Un lotissement - allotment subdivision (of land)
On se croirait - one would believe (reflexive) used in the phrase ‘on se croirait en banlieue parisienne’ - one would believe themselves to be in a Parisian suburb.
Se hâter - to rush oneself
Bourgades - towns
Boîte de nuit - nightclub
Piétiner - to trample
On se prend à réfléchir… - one starts to think…
Une grève de la faim - a hunger strike
Poignardé - stabbed
Osé - dared to
On s’en fout? - who cares?
Charnues - fleshy (pl)
le Moule - mold (shaped container)
Revendication - claim/demand
Sitôt que - as soon as
Voué - dedicated
Aveugler - to blind
Atouts - assets
Raz-de-marée - tidal wave
Mollets - calves
J’y ai pris goût - I’ve taken a liking
Fleurir - to flourish/bloom
Vertus - virtues
Rayonner - to shine
Axée sur - focused on

I hope it’s okay if I correct things, I assume it is unless told otherwise, because I just want to help and I don’t want people to learn false things.

I didn’t know the translation of lotissement, nor did I know “allotment” so I checked these up and if I understood right they’re mostly false friends! I’m still not 100% sure though.

I added details on the word moule/mold (or mould) because there are different meanings in English and French (depending on the gender for the latter):

  • le moule, nm : mold (shaped container)
  • mouler, vtr : to mold
  • la moule, nf : mussel
  • la moisissure, nf : mold (fungus)

I also recommend to always add the article to nouns to learn the gender more easily: le/la or un/une (especially if the definite article is l’).

Thanks! I used an online translator for the translations, so I appreciate the correction! I totally agree with the article thing, so I’ll definitely start doing that. Aveugler was being used as a noun in the magazine, so I’m a bit confused. It looks like a verb to me too! As for le moule, it was in the context of ideas of beauty and ‘breaking the mould’ - so abstract noun as well as concrete? Thanks again!

The article for the gender is a thing I recommend for every language with grammatical genders and separate articles, especially since the endings in French rarely help guessing the gender.

What was the sentence containing “aveugler”? was it something like “blablah cette chose va l’aveugler”? because if yes, it is not a noun but a verb :) l’ being the pronoun for him/her (direct object).

Yes literal and figurative meaning :)

speutschlish

About to get a little preachy…

dnyjsoudlouhe:

So I know I’ve had my rants about this before, but bear with me. Also, there is a tl;dr at the bottom of this post.

As regards the memes that float around about the differences in languages where a word from a series of languages in the same family is compared and then a COMPLETELY unrelated language is thrown in for contrast, mainly to belittle that language (mostly German… which angers me for a totally different reason), this pattern needs to STOP!

If one seeks ridiculousness among languages, there is no need to bring in an unrelated language when comparing a given family. For Germanics, look no further than Icelandic. An example being something I reblogged earlier and edited to take Finnish out of the picture (the post about spider below this one) and substituted Icelandic instead. Is it really necessary to use Finnish’s hämähäkki in this instance? What’s wrong with Icelandic’s kónguló? Kónguló is far enough removed from spider/Spinne/spin etc. that using Finnish’s different word for spider (which comes from it being in a GODDAMN DIFFERENT LANGUAGE FAMILY THAN THE OTHERS BEFORE IT) is nothing more than, as I stated before, belittling.

Now… let’s compare Finnish, Estonian and Hungarian, as they are all part of the same language family. And let’s take a simple word like… wind.

Finnish: tuuli
Estoniantuul
Hungarian: szél

There is enough ridiculousness (if you want to call it that) among language families if you want to compare word choice that it is wholly unnecessary to bring in a language from a different family just to make fun of it. In the example above, Finnish and Estonian (I’m imagining them like the flag balls in polandballcomics) would be looking incredulously at their family member, Hungarian, and Hungarian would just kind of be there like “yeah, what?” not really understanding what the big issue is.

Let’s take Finnish, Estonian and Hungarian again and use the spider example, just to bring things full circle. The following are the words for “spiders” in these three languages.

Finnish: hämähäkit
Estonian: ämblikulised
Hungarian: pókok

And this is the point where all 3 languages just stare at each other and say, what the fuck, guys? How are we related?

My point is thusly illustrated… find ridiculousness among members of a common language family.

TL;DR: Stop using one language family to make fun of a member of another.

allthelanguages
linguaphilioist:

I read some of this this afternoon, here’s some vocab:
Un lotissement - allotment subdivision (of land) On se croirait - one would believe (reflexive) used in the phrase ‘on se croirait en banlieue parisienne’ - one would believe themselves to be in a Parisian suburb.  Se hâter - to rush oneself Bourgades - towns Boîte de nuit - nightclub Piétiner - to trample On se prend à réfléchir… - one starts to think… Une grève de la faim - a hunger strike Poignardé - stabbed Osé - dared to  On s’en fout? - who cares? Charnues - fleshy (pl)le Moule - mold (shaped container) Revendication - claim/demand Sitôt que - as soon as Voué - dedicated Aveugler - to blind Atouts - assets Raz-de-marée - tidal wave Mollets - calves J’y ai pris goût - I’ve taken a liking Fleurir - to flourish/bloom Vertus - virtues Rayonner - to shine Axée sur - focused on

I hope it’s okay if I correct things, I assume it is unless told otherwise, because I just want to help and I don’t want people to learn false things.
I didn’t know the translation of lotissement, nor did I know “allotment” so I checked these up and if I understood right they’re mostly false friends! I’m still not 100% sure though.
I added details on the word moule/mold (or mould) because there are different meanings in English and French (depending on the gender for the latter):
le moule, nm : mold (shaped container)
mouler, vtr : to mold
la moule, nf : mussel
la moisissure, nf : mold (fungus)
I also recommend to always add the article to nouns to learn the gender more easily: le/la or un/une (especially if the definite article is l’).

linguaphilioist:

I read some of this this afternoon, here’s some vocab:

Un lotissement - allotment subdivision (of land)
On se croirait - one would believe (reflexive) used in the phrase ‘on se croirait en banlieue parisienne’ - one would believe themselves to be in a Parisian suburb.
Se hâter - to rush oneself
Bourgades - towns
Boîte de nuit - nightclub
Piétiner - to trample
On se prend à réfléchir… - one starts to think…
Une grève de la faim - a hunger strike
Poignardé - stabbed
Osé - dared to
On s’en fout? - who cares?
Charnues - fleshy (pl)
le Moule - mold (shaped container)
Revendication - claim/demand
Sitôt que - as soon as
Voué - dedicated
Aveugler - to blind
Atouts - assets
Raz-de-marée - tidal wave
Mollets - calves
J’y ai pris goût - I’ve taken a liking
Fleurir - to flourish/bloom
Vertus - virtues
Rayonner - to shine
Axée sur - focused on

I hope it’s okay if I correct things, I assume it is unless told otherwise, because I just want to help and I don’t want people to learn false things.

I didn’t know the translation of lotissement, nor did I know “allotment” so I checked these up and if I understood right they’re mostly false friends! I’m still not 100% sure though.

I added details on the word moule/mold (or mould) because there are different meanings in English and French (depending on the gender for the latter):

  • le moule, nm : mold (shaped container)
  • mouler, vtr : to mold
  • la moule, nf : mussel
  • la moisissure, nf : mold (fungus)

I also recommend to always add the article to nouns to learn the gender more easily: le/la or un/une (especially if the definite article is l’).

allthelanguages

Anonymous asked:

is "l'esprit de l'escalier" a real thing?

awesomefrench answered:

Nope 

nope 

no 

no (spanish accent)

niet

nEIN

It’s an old metaphor which first appeared around 1780 (I don’t bullshit you when I say it’s old) and I guess someone saw it in a book at some point, went crazy because it’s oh so damn hipster, and now all cheezy francophiles use it as their motto. Truly, I’ve never used it, not a single time in my whole life. And I’m a Diderot fan. 

Anonymous asked:

"est-ce qu'il faudraiT"** non ?

WOW THANKS I WAS VERY TIRED BUT THAT IS NO EXCUSE FOR MY BAD FRENCH D:

edit: MERCI PUTAIN J’ÉTAIS CREVÉ AVEC UN MAL DE CRÂNE PAS POSSIBLE QUAND J’AI ÉCRIT ÇA DÉSOLÉ JE N’AI AUCUNE EXCUSE MAIS SOYEZ INDULGENTS